What is Your Mission Statement?


I’m busy today, looking for lost car keys, picking up my kitchen and finishing forms that I procrastinated on. It’s Anti-Procrastination Day – a day late. Leave it to me to be behind on a scheduled day.

I’m a little off this week, what with my hardrive crashing on my lap top and trying to get that fixed and here we are on Thursday and I’m having to remind myself that “I’m not behind, just jump in where ever I am.”

I am too behind, I’m just trying not to get anxiety over it.

While answering the last few questions on my form that has to be mailed no later than tomorrow – I’m stuck on the “What is your mission statement” question. I really don’t have one, and I know they are popular and all, but I’ve never really thought about that one long enough to actually write one out.

If I could have one – I know it would be similar to these paragraphs by Henri Nouwen, from The Wounded Healer. (pp 38-39)

“The key word here is articulation. The man who can articulate the movements of his inner life, who can give names to his varied experiences, need no longer be a victim of himself, but is able slowly and consistently to remove the obstacles that prevent the spirit from entering. He is able to create space for Him whose heart is greater than his, whose eyes see more than his, and whose hands can heal more than his.

This articulation, I believe, is the basis for a spiritual leadership of the future, because only he who is able to articulate his own experience can offer himself to others as a source of clarification. The Christian leader is, therefore, first of all, a man who is willing to put his own articulated faith at the disposal of those who ask his help. In this sense he is a servant of servants, because he is the first to enter the promised but dangerous land, the first to tell those who are afraid what he has seen, heard and touched.

….the minister tries to help people to recognize the work of God in themselves. The Christian leader, minister or priest, is not one who reveals God to his people-who gives something he has to those who have nothing-but one who helps those who are searching to discover reality as the source of their existence. In this sense we can say that the Christian leader leads man to confession, in the classic sense of the word: to the basic affirmation that man is man and God is God, and that without Go, man cannot be called man…it is a deep human encounter in which a man is willing to put his own faith and doubt, his own hope and despair, his oven light and darkness at the disposal of others who want to find a way through their confusion, and touch the solid core of life. In this context preaching means more than handing over a tradition; it is rather the careful and sensitive articulation of what is happening in the community so that those who listen can say: “You say what I suspected, you express what I vaguely felt, you bring to the fore what I fearfully kept in the back of my mind. yes, yes-you say who we are, you recognize our condition…”

Emphasis mine.

I am not in the place of the Holy Spirit, I cannot reveal God to you or anyone else. I can only travel as a fellow sojourner, it isn’t even my place to hand over tradition as if in following that, we find God. All I can be is one who helps those who are searching, find their source. I like this thought right here, the minister tries to help people to recognize the work of God in themselves. The Christian leader, minister or priest, is not one who reveals God to his people-who gives something he has to those who have nothing-but one who helps those who are searching to discover reality as the source of their existence.

Somewhere in there is the answer to the question on the page, and maybe a clarifying thought for myself.

To quote John the Baptist, “I am not the Christ.” – But I can help you see him, by finding Him in me.

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